002 - To each his own.

So I love looking through photos from car meets worldwide, and seeing the many different tuning styles that people do when building a car. At work, I'm often made fun of for what I think looks good, or what I think is cool. Perhaps it's the fact that I enjoy the more obscure cars. Or perhaps I like things that other people think are "outplayed", "Overdone" or "Too-Cliche"...but most of it has to do with the fact that I love import cars, and I work at a GM dealership in a GM town in the state where all of the big 3 are headquartered.

Either way, I don't let people influence my taste in cars. I love wagons. The more obscure, the better.
Cars like the Dodge Aries K wagon, the Volvo 240GL Turbo wagon, the Opel Kadett 1900 wagon or the Chevrolet Monza Shooting Brake. I love them. Something about the wagon shape, the practicality of it...I find that awesome.

The things one can do to such cars makes all the difference. Wheels, suspension, restoration..
It can take an otherwise dull and boring grocery-getter and transform it into an amazing, show-winning car.

-Phil

Comments

  1. I remember seeing a documentary on the car scene out in Michigan and saw all sorts of old school muscle cars still being raced or on display for show, but it did appear that the import scene was thin. This post gives the same impression!

    Definitely a fan of rare (Though exotic need not mutually apply) cars that can boldly represent their kind just with their presence in a meet alone. Those kinds of builds tend to catch my attention the most, since the blank canvases that they are tend to see lots of customization. Lots of unique stories have been told by the drivers, as well, adding to the experience!

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  2. Sadly, the import scene here is small. Michigan is definitely not conducive to owning a classic Japanese car, or any nice car for that matter. Our roads here are horrible. Potholes, broken roads, badly-executed repairs... And our state uses so much salt this time of the year. So much so that we frequently experience salt shortages... I wish things were different.

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  3. Oh, wow. Sounds a lot like Texas minus the salt (We use magnesium, apparently). That's gotta make things tough! Are the few who love imports at least a tight-knit group?

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    1. the group I hang out with is, though it's not all Import enthusiasts. It's more just fellow gearheads hanging out with eachother. We've got DSM guys, Nissan guys, Lots of Subaru guys, a few rotary guys, lots of mustang, camaro and truck guys, a few corvette guys..hell even a DeLorean owner...

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    2. That makes it fun! (And holy crap- a friggin' DeLorean!) Though occasionally something comes up about the domestic vs imports in our circles, the atmosphere tends to be very relaxed, just because everybody knows someone who has a car "from the other side." Definitely a great atmosphere, though I admit that sometimes a bit of drama stirs things up in an entertaining fashion.

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    3. We do have a good time at our meets. We have, since 2007, done Autocross here on Campus, but a mishap last summer involving a poorly-designed section of the course and a supercharged corvette ended that. We've effectively been banned from Autocross on campus. Not the drivers fault, fortunately, but still, not something we like seeing.

      As far as drama, we really don't have much, which is nice. We try to keep in good standings with MSU, and, apart from the previously mentioned mishap, we have. Unfortunately, all it takes is a bit of drama getting out of hand to ruin everything for everyone.

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